Tag Archives: Media Buying

Media Spotlight: VP Interactive, Cheryl Rogers Ill

Editor’s note: “Media Spotlight” is an ongoing series where we interview the wide range of professionals that make up our growing office. From the traditional media planners to our digital buyers, you’ll gain insight into the many levels that make up Media Works Ltd. This week we interview VP Interactive, Cheryl Rogers Ill.

How long have you been working in media/ advertising?

 I have been in the media industry since 1994 where I started as a media assistant for a political media buying firm.   At the time, I had no media experience, but the owner hired me because I had been a server at a restaurant.  To him, that meant I had the ability to manage my time, work as a team and interface with clients.  And that was my start.  From there, I went to work for a few full service agencies.  Then, in 2008 I came to Media Works.

Can you describe a day in your life at Media Works?

Since coming to Media Works, I have had the opportunity to work on many different categories from Healthcare, Automotive, Education and CPG.  While the majority of my responsibilities are research, planning and buying digital media, I have a strong background in traditional media.  I feel like this gives me the ability to see how both traditional and digital media work and how they can work together.  I’m so fortunate that I have been able to break into the digital space.  Digital media continues to grow.  Six years ago, we had to prove why clients should be in this space.  Now, some kind of digital media is always included.  The digital landscape is constantly changing and it is very exciting.

What are some of the challenges of your position?

One of the biggest changes is keeping up with the new media opportunities – a lot which stem from technology and data.  The next challenge is then trying to explain how this technology and data work together to reach their target audience.  In the digital space, it is more than just demographics.  With data and technology, an advertiser can reach a thirty year old woman with a 2 year old in the house and has an intent to purchase diapers.  Another challenge is mobile.  This space continues to provide our clients with an opportunity to reach their consumers, but we need to help them on how to do that and make is successful.  What works on the desktop does not necessarily work on a smartphone.

What’s your all-time favorite ad campaign? What made it special?

I wouldn’t say that I have an all-time favorite ad campaign.  And while many campaigns have a lot of legs to them that go across platforms, there are a few TV commercials that still make me laugh when I think of them.  One is the “Fishy-Fishy” TV spot that McDonald’s ran last year during Lent and the other one is the Geico “Hump-Day” commercial with the camel.  These commercials were silly and made me laugh.

What advice would you offer to someone looking to get into the advertising industry?

I would recommend internships to figure out what you want to do.  There are some many different departments.  Then within the departments there could be many specializations.  Ask questions.  Volunteer if asked.  Work on new business if given the opportunity.

What’s something that no one knows about you?

I took piano lessons for many years.   I wish I had not given it up when I was a junior in high school.  My parents still have my piano.  Maybe one day I will pick it up again.

New York, New York: Recap From The 4A’s Data Summit

The 4A’s hosted their first ever Data Summit in New York on Wednesday Oct 16th with a jam packed agenda corresponding to the growing trend in big data and how it is evolving the advertising industry.

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I was skeptical at first that the conference would dive so deep into the numbers that the strategy side of data would be lost.  To my surprise, I spent a wonderful day listening to numerous industry leaders, technology companies, and even a data scientist who impressed me with his knowledge on the wide world of data.  Here’s a brief look at my top 5 takeaways from the day:

  1.  Data and Privacy – there was a lively debate about privacy issues as it relates to data collecting and who is really being harmed in the process.  I think as long as we give the consumer a choice we can stay in front of strict regulations.  Clients want to build trust with their consumer, even more so today than ever, so if we are transparent with them we can make their ad experience better and more relevant.
  2. Programmatic Buying – the panel started out with a real time media trade and ended with a lively panel discussing this hot topic.  Data is allowing us to shift our thoughts from media buying to audience buying in a way we could never do before.  Real time trading allows machines to do the work faster than a human could and with a new resurgence of this concept higher quality placements and reach are at your fingertips.  I feel in an area where inventory can be limitless such as the web the trading desk can succeed but in an area where inventory is so limited such as TV and cable it will be hard to move to this model in the near future.
  3.  Facebook as a solutions provider – Facebook is committed to moving their advertising offerings to the next step and provide clients with real ROI on their business outcomes.  They are focused on providing advertising solutions for the mobile space since people are checking their phone on average 100 x a day.  It will be interesting to watch this next progression with Facebook since up until now it has been more focused on engagement metrics.
  4. Creativity comes from everywhere – media, data, creative, and technologist all need to come together to find solutions for clients to reach their audience.  We need to look to transform our own business to break down any silos that prohibit creative thinking.  The customer has to be in the center and we need to follow them on how they interact with a brand and what technology they use to do that.  We need to consider how a consumer connects with their multiple screens and devise a creative strategy for the context of that device.
  5. Future trends to keep an eye on – a representative from Goldman Sachs presented an enlightening snapshot at how Wall Street values big data.  They believe ad dollars will continue to shift online and that programmatic buying will continue to grow.  They predict a time when their will be frictionless buying across traditional and digital platforms.  (Can we say hallelujah!)  They believe the visualization of the web will continue as well as growth with companies leveraging first party data (Facebook, Amazon, LinkedIn).

In the end the trip was a HUGE success and we learned so much. Thanks to the 4A’s for putting this conference together. We can’t wait to come back up next year.

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Media Spotlight: Ryan Trott, Media Buyer

MW2013-139smallEditor’s note: “Media Spotlight” is an ongoing series where we interview the wide range of professionals that make up our growing office. From the traditional media planners to our digital buyers, you’ll gain insight into the many levels that make up Media Works Ltd. This week we interview Media Buyer, Ryan Trott

How long have you been working in media/ advertising?

I have been working in the advertising industry for 4 years. Starting as the Business/Sponsorship Manager at my college radio station (WVYC – York College of PA). In my senior year of college I held internships with the Promotions Department at 98 Rock and the Marketing/PR Department at the Baltimore Arena. After graduating from College a little more than 2 years ago I began my career at Media Works as an Assistant Buyer.

Can you describe a day in your life at Media Works?

Every day has its own obstacles but usually includes a mix of planning, researching, invoicing and looking forward to lunch. One of the upsides to working in advertising is that you are constantly working on several projects in different phases at once. If you get burnt out on one, you can take a break, focus on something else for a few hours and come back with a fresh look.

What are some of the challenges of your position?

The biggest challenge is keeping up with the rapidly evolving media landscape. There are always new options popping up, the challenge is testing the effectiveness of these options and deciding if they fit in our campaign or not.

What’s your all-time favorite ad campaign? What made it special?

The All State Mayhem Commercials. What makes them special? They’re hilarious. They are funny but also effectively reinforce the importance of insurance coverage.

What advice would you offer to someone looking to get into the advertising industry?

Take internships, network and research. There are many niches within the advertising industry and its important to know what your options are. When I interned at the arena, I had the chance to work with promoters, buyers, creative people, public relations teams and account people. It really gave me some insight into where each of these roles fall within a campaign. Also, network and never burn any bridges. In my few years in advertising, I have noticed that everyone seems to know everyone else, so who you know and a good recommendation goes a long way.

What’s something that no one knows about you?

I have never tried a Slim Jim.

 

Media Spotlight: Lauren Barnaba, Digital Media Planner

profilepicEditor’s note: “Media Spotlight” is an ongoing series where we interview the wide range of professionals that make up our growing office. From the traditional media planners to our digital buyers, you’ll gain insight into the many levels that make up Media Works Ltd. This week we interview Digital Media Buyer, Lauren Barnaba.

Q: How long have you been working in media/ advertising?

I’ve been working in the Advertising industry since I graduated college. Prior to Media Works I worked at a staffing agency called Profiles where I was their Marketing Coordinator. I’m going on 4 years at Media Works in November!

Q: Can you describe a day in your life at Media Works?

Each and every day at Media Works is fairly different but typically starts out with 3 large cups of coffee! Throughout the day I like to do my research to keep up on industry trends via blogs, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. I normally have a few webinars and meetings each week to keep up with new offerings in the market for my clients. Every day I monitor, bid & report on Facebook and Google campaigns, making sure I’m staying within my budget for each campaign. There are many brainstorming sessions that happen in the Interactive Pod (iPod) throughout the day. I also spend my time planning for future campaigns, talking with sites & vendors and making sure emails get answered.

Q: What are some of the challenges of your position?

The advertising world is changing every minute so a big challenge for me is keeping up with all the new trends in the market, social media platforms, and other opportunities for my clients. Facebook and Google specifically are always rolling out new features so it’s my job to keep up with all the latest and greatest!

Q: What’s your all-time favorite ad campaign? What made it special?

I honestly don’t have a favorite but I can tell you that I get pretty serious during the Super bowl commercials. I did a project in my advertising class in college on the Super bowl ads and have been analyzing since then. I do always enjoy the E-Trade baby, Bud Light and Doritos commercials. Most recently, I love the Volkswagen dog ad. The one where the dog works out to get through the doggy door. It hits home for me because I grew up with a dog and consider myself a dog lover!

Q: What advice would you offer to someone looking to get into the advertising industry?

If you are still in college or a recent college grad make sure you intern as much as you can in the industry and learn, learn, learn about each sector of advertising! Network and surround yourself with professionals to get involved and make a name for yourself. Attend webinars to educate and keep up with current trends. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.

Q: What’s something that no one knows about you?

I played on the #1 soccer team in the nation my senior year of high school. I have also met and hung out with John Mayer while in NYC.

Media Spotlight: Amy Wisner, Executive Vice President

315435fEditor’s note: “Media Spotlight” is an ongoing series where we interview the wide range of professionals that make up our growing office. From the traditional media planners to our digital buyers, you’ll gain insight into the many levels that make up Media Works Ltd. This week we interview Executive Vice President, Amy Wisner.

Q: How did you get your start at Media Works?

I had moved back to the Baltimore/Washington area after living in Honolulu, Hawaii for three years.  (yes, it was amazing). I began searching for an entry level position inside an advertising or public relations agency.  I saw an ad in the paper for a junior media buyer position at Media Works and FAXED (yes, that is how it was done back then) my resume over to Media Works. I received a call to come in for an interview and was so excited. After meeting with Jody and a couple other employees I could tell it was the perfect fit for me. The company was small enough that I would be able to learn quickly and wear lots of hats, which definitely enticed me. They were also going through a growth period with a couple new big clients coming on board so I knew it was a great opportunity. A few days before my 25th birthday Jody called and offered me the job! Of course I accepted and haven’t looked back since.

Q: What motivates you?

My biggest motivator comes from my constant desire to learn and grow. I am fortunate to be in an industry that is constantly changing. New emerging media and technology innovations force me to learn something new all the time. I really enjoy the research side of our industry and understanding how the different target audiences are using and engaging with different media platforms.

Q: What’s a common misconception about advertising you’d like to dispel?

People tend to think that the way they consume media or spend time with media is the same as everyone else. For example, if they listen to a certain radio station then everyone must listen to that same radio station. It is so important to look outside of your own everyday habits and trust that the research and media measurement systems in place will guide the media plan in the right direction.

Q: What advice would you give a young person just starting out in this business?

I would tell a young person starting out to learn as much as they can about the digital media space. There are definitely job opportunities out there for experienced digital media planners and buyers. I would also tell someone to make sure they are signing up and using all the new media platforms especially in the social space. It will help you to understand them and understand what target audience is using them.

Q: What has been a defining moment during your time at Media Works?

A few years ago we were flying back from a big new business pitch and got the call while we were still at the airport that we won the business. This account was going to be a game changer for us in terms of escalating us to the next level. I remember feeling so excited about all the hard work we had put into the pitch and so proud that it all paid off. As the management team sat at the airport that afternoon we celebrated the success and knew as soon as the plane hit the ground in Baltimore the company would forever be changed.

Media Spotlight: Jody Berg, CEO

Jody Spotlight PicEditor’s note: “Media Spotlight” is an ongoing series where we interview the wide range of professionals that make up our growing office. From the traditional media planners to our digital buyers, you’ll gain insight into the many levels that make up Media Works Ltd. This week we interview Jody Berg, CEO of Media Works.

Q: How did you get your start at Media Works?

Having my father’s entrepreneurial spirit has always driven me to create something for myself and control my own destiny. For years I worked in media at a number of different ad agencies and felt that media departments were often looked over for brainstorming sessions and I felt that I had more to offer. Working at various advertising agencies here in Baltimore, like GKV, Carton Donofrio, and Image Dynamics, I felt it was time to expand and start my own agency. It was around this time that I had my first child and I wanted the flexibility to work and spend time with my family.  So, in 1989 I created Media Works and I setup shop right at the kitchen table of my townhouse.

Q: How is your business model different?

From the very beginning, Media Works has always been focused on the media only side of advertising. When we first started we were the second media only agency to get started in Baltimore. At that time it was all about having the “big agency.” It gave us the opportunity to give our clients the best media recommendations without being biased from what the creative departments wanted. While other agencies have account and creative departments, our strategy has always been to standout and be judged on what we do best. Being able to focus on the media also allows us to partner with other agencies that are doing great creative work in and around Baltimore. This is important because it allows us to be flexible in our approach to new business while staying current on the latest trends in our business.

Q: How would you describe your leadership style?

Being a good listener has always been a value of mine. You can ask anyone here and they’ll tell you that I keep an open door policy. Whether it’s my executive team or the employees here, I make a point to listen to other opinions and rely on the perspectives of those I work with. Before any large decisions are made I consult my executive team so that we can make a unified decision. I surround myself with bright people who are very good in their fields.

Q: What do you like most about Media Works?

My favorite part about Media Works is the people who work for me and our clients. The energy and the personalities here really make us a unique team that you’ll be hard pressed to find anywhere else. We have some people who’ve worked here for 10+ years and have seen us grow to the 30 employees we have today. The loyalty of everyone here really makes us like a family. As a team, we work hard and play hard and it shows in the work that we do.

Q: What do you feel is your most significant achievement?

It’s hard to choose just one. For me, staying in business for 24 years is a huge achievement. With any business you’re going to have challenges, but being able to grow our business at a steady pace really makes it all worthwhile. We also have clients who’ve been with Media Works for over 10 years and that means a lot. Being able to stay responsive to an ever changing industry also is something I’m proud of.

For more information, please visit our website at www.medialtd.com

Does Political Advertising Really Sway Voters? Media Works weighs in!

I think there will be a collective sigh of relief from the advertising world come next Wednesday, especially if you live in a coveted “swing state”.  The campaign is set to spend a record $6 Billion in advertising – this is $700 Million more than the previous record set in 2008.  This is partially due to the Supreme Court case (Citizen’s United), which lifted the ban on the ability of super PACs to spend unlimited amounts without disclosing their donors.

The spending from outside groups is expected to total more than $970 Million – 3x the previous record of $301 Million set in 2008 (prior to the Citizen’s United ruling).   The majority of these dollars is spent on Television advertising, including cable, which local clients tend to flood because they can buy the zones that represent their districts, and it is the most effective way to reach the largest number of people in those areas.  Online spending is also expected to reap the benefits of extra dollars – projecting a sixfold increase from 2008, up to $159.2 Million.  This is still a drop in the bucket (1.5%), but spending for local races may go as high as 12% of a politician’s budget.

Political Spending in Baltimore

In our office, we’ve felt the ripple effect of the dollars being spent by candidates as well as “issue advertising”.  Locally, the Baltimore market has seen an influx of outside spending on the issues known as Question 6, which would approve a law that allows same-sex couples to obtain a civil marriage license, and Question 7. Question 7 proposes a sixth casino in Maryland, as well as table games at all six sites. The pro-side has spent over $32 Million and not to be outdone, the Anti-Question 7 side spent over $33 Million.  To put these figures into perspective, each side alone spent almost double what was spent on the last governor’s race in Maryland in 2010 ($17 Million).

Political Spending in Washington, DC

In Washington, the situation is worse because Virginia is a swing state and the DC market is important to Northern Virginia.  Some of our clients opted not to advertise on TV for the whole quarter, knowing that once the election ended, airtime would still be in demand due to advertisers who wanted to wait until mid-November. Holiday retailers will also be spending more, and this would cause pricing to remain high.

A survey of 80 agencies conducted by Strata in October found that 47% of media buyers were planning to wait till after the election to place advertising for their clients.

Does political advertising really sway voters? My vote is “yes”, otherwise politicians and activist groups wouldn’t spend so much money to get just 6% of undecided voters to make up their minds.  And, it seems that as the political battle gets nastier, it doesn’t seem to matter whether claims made by both parties are true or not.   But take comfort in knowing that in 96 hours, it will all be over – unless of course we experience another 2000!!

 

This 4 year old girl from Colorado demonstrates how many of us are feeling: